"And so, as Zelda moves forward into another posthumous year, let’s strive to remember her anew as the woman Edmund Wilson rightfully called “iridescent,” who saw the world through ardent eyes spectacularly attuned to all things beautiful, and who, in the words of Alabama Beggs, refused to be a “back-seat driver about life.” Let’s allow her to finally take up her rightful place as a formidable artist not by canonizing her as one of the somebodies into which we’ve bent her, but as the somebody she truly was all along."
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Anonymous asked: Do you know where I could buy a physical copy of Save Me The Last Waltz? I know it's a hard read, and I've heard her writing style it messy

I got my copy for a birthday present but looking at copies online it is surprisingly expensive. The collected writings on amazon is $25 new, Powell’s has it at $35, and Books A Million has it for $30Powell’s has just Save Me the Waltz for $15.50 and I didn’t find it on amazon or Books A Million. 

I wouldn’t say it was a hard read, except maybe emotionally (because you know it is autobiographical and you can feel her pain and heartache). But there were a lot of clunky sentences and typos. Scribners basically didn’t spend any money on it at all, it wasn’t even proofread before being published. Also Scott edited it extensive so who knows how it was before he edited it.

tagged → #asks #Anonymous

About this post half the places I’ve seen it written have the title spelled like Smokey and the other half say Smoky so I’m not too sure how Zelda spelled it (and I don’t have the book about her art in front of me to double check). So I’m not sure whether to change the spelling or put a sic in the post. 

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Great Smokey Mountains by Zelda Fitzgerald
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fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Great Smokey Mountains by Zelda Fitzgerald

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saisonciel:

Florence Eldridge, 1930s

saisonciel:

Florence Eldridge, 1930s

tagged → #reblogs
"Over the Top with Pershing" by Zelda Sayre

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

The night was dark, the rain came down,
The boys stepped off with never a frown.
Into the trench all mud and slime,
And thousands of miles from their native clime,
They took their places in face of death,
And waited their turn with bated breath,
'Til the order came to open fire,
They screwed their courage higher and higher.
Over the top they go to fight
For suffering friends and human right,
Over the top they see their way
To a clearer aim and a freer day,
Over the top, O God of Might,
Help our laddies to win the fight.

Zelda wrote this when she was 17 to go in the school paper. It was then printed in the local newspaper. Minnie Sayre (Zelda’s mother) may have helped Zelda with this poem. When Zelda pasted the poem into her scrapbook she wrote “Not only is necessity the mother of invention but a mother of invention is necessary.”

"To-day there is promise of spring in the air and an aura of sunshine over the mountains; the mountains seem to hold more weather than elsewhere and time and retrospect flood roseate down the long hill-sides."

Zelda’s last letter written on March 9, 1948. She would die the next night.

Scottie the Daughter of by Eleanor Lanahan pg 180.

(via fyeahzeldafitzgerald)

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Zelda and F Scott Fitzgerald
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fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Zelda and F Scott Fitzgerald

[X]

Reasons Why I love Zelda Fitzgerald

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

  • Zelda was fantastically selfish. 
  • Zelda stood up to Scott
  • She wore a flesh colored swimsuit to pretend like she was naked
  • Zelda actually did swim naked 
  • In Montgomery Zelda persuaded the trolley operator to let her drive and she promptly drove it off the tracks
  • She made her own jewelry.
  • Zelda lived an extraordinary life and never apologized for it. She lived life to the fullest.