The Treachery of Images - René Magritte 1928-1929

The Treachery of Images - René Magritte 1928-1929

welldressedflapper:

Pin by Well Dressed Flapper on ***Photography of people/faces*** | Pi… on We Heart It.

These people are not F Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald

welldressedflapper:

Pin by Well Dressed Flapper on ***Photography of people/faces*** | Pi… on We Heart It.

These people are not F Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald

kittyinva:

Kittyinva: 1920’s teal cut-velvet chiffon shawl. From Carolyn Forbes Textiles.

kittyinva:

Kittyinva: 1920’s teal cut-velvet chiffon shawl. From Carolyn Forbes Textiles.

tagged → #reblogs

vintageeveryday:

Women’s trousers dress, ca. 1910s.

tagged → #reblogs
elegance-decadence:

Tea party (1912)

elegance-decadence:

  • Tea party (1912)
tagged → #reblogs
Footage of the Fitzgeralds
F Scott Fitzgerald reading John Masefield, voice only
F Scott Fitzgerald reading John Keats Ode To A Nightingale, voice only 
F Scott Fitzgerald reading Othello Act 1, Scene 3, voice only
F Scott Fitzgerald writing at a desk in Paris
F Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald sitting at a table in Paris
Zelda Fitzgerald walking and F Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald playing with baby Scottie (some errors such as when the Great Depression started)
The Fitzgerald’s Works Online
All of F Scott Fitzgerald’s works except The Last Tycoon
Audio books of four short stories by F Scott Fitzgerald
17 scholarly essays on F Scott Fitzgerald and his writing
Zelda Fitzgerald’s short story The Iceberg
Zelda Fitzgerald’s essay Eulogy On The Flapper, also a few of F Scott Fitzgerald’s short stories
Zelda Fitzgerald’s poem Over The Top With Pershing 
My Personal Favorite Biographies
Scottie the Daughter Of by Eleanor Lanahan
Zelda Fitzgerald: Her Voice in Paradise by Sally Cline
Sometimes Madness Is Wisdom: Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald: A Marriage by Kendall Taylor
Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald: An American Woman’s Life by Linda Wagner-Martin

Footage of the Fitzgeralds

The Fitzgerald’s Works Online

My Personal Favorite Biographies

orsomethinglikethatreally:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

I don’t want to hijack this person’s post so instead I’ll make my own (I swear this is not being passive aggressive I just don’t want to take over their post or start something).
I totally agree that Zelda shouldn’t be labeled a martyr. But we can talk about Zelda without taking away from other women writers. People can discuss and care about more than one thing at a time. It would be ridiculous if I was talking about Jane Austen for example and someone shouted ‘well what about Mary Wollstonecraft!’. If you are afraid of those other writers being lost to time then tell people about them, don’t tack it on to a story about something different.
Guess what I love Christina Rossetti but I don’t bring her up here because she has no place here. This blog is about Zelda Fitzgerald and the culture that surrounded her. I have brought up some cultural things she liked or would have seen, like the book The Salamander. In an article about The Fitzgeralds do we really have to say ‘don’t talk about Zelda cause it is taking away from other writers’? Why not tell people to stop reading, teaching, or talking about Scott because he overshadows other authors of his time?
And that line “did their work done and their selves expressed in even more resistant circumstances” made me see red. I hate this so much (I’m trying my hardest not to caps lock or just type a string of curses here). It’s the same as telling someone to get over their depression because someone else has a tragic life. Zelda had some really tragic times in her life and telling her (or telling her fans) that she didn’t go through anything and shouldn’t be celebrated but these women went through worse is just absurd. I don’t know about those two women he spoke about but just because one person has a tragic life it doesn’t take away the pain in your own life. No one would ever say the reverse, that you can’t be happy because someone has had a better life.
The more I see of this article the more I hate it.

yes. this article by adam gopnik, ugh. he was obviously bashing both scott and zelda fitzgerald. on the article gopnik said scott’s best work was “The Crack Up.” wtf? and the way he discredited zelda, it was as if zelda didn’t really suffer because she was famous for suffering. what the hell is wrong with this adam gopnik bastard?

There was so much of the article I wanted to rebuttal. I couldn’t even read the whole thing. I was either seething in rage or rolling my eyes at what I did read.

orsomethinglikethatreally:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

I don’t want to hijack this person’s post so instead I’ll make my own (I swear this is not being passive aggressive I just don’t want to take over their post or start something).

I totally agree that Zelda shouldn’t be labeled a martyr. But we can talk about Zelda without taking away from other women writers. People can discuss and care about more than one thing at a time. It would be ridiculous if I was talking about Jane Austen for example and someone shouted ‘well what about Mary Wollstonecraft!’. If you are afraid of those other writers being lost to time then tell people about them, don’t tack it on to a story about something different.

Guess what I love Christina Rossetti but I don’t bring her up here because she has no place here. This blog is about Zelda Fitzgerald and the culture that surrounded her. I have brought up some cultural things she liked or would have seen, like the book The Salamander. In an article about The Fitzgeralds do we really have to say ‘don’t talk about Zelda cause it is taking away from other writers’? Why not tell people to stop reading, teaching, or talking about Scott because he overshadows other authors of his time?

And that line “did their work done and their selves expressed in even more resistant circumstances” made me see red. I hate this so much (I’m trying my hardest not to caps lock or just type a string of curses here). It’s the same as telling someone to get over their depression because someone else has a tragic life. Zelda had some really tragic times in her life and telling her (or telling her fans) that she didn’t go through anything and shouldn’t be celebrated but these women went through worse is just absurd. I don’t know about those two women he spoke about but just because one person has a tragic life it doesn’t take away the pain in your own life. No one would ever say the reverse, that you can’t be happy because someone has had a better life.

The more I see of this article the more I hate it.

yes. this article by adam gopnik, ugh. he was obviously bashing both scott and zelda fitzgerald. on the article gopnik said scott’s best work was “The Crack Up.” wtf? and the way he discredited zelda, it was as if zelda didn’t really suffer because she was famous for suffering. what the hell is wrong with this adam gopnik bastard?

There was so much of the article I wanted to rebuttal. I couldn’t even read the whole thing. I was either seething in rage or rolling my eyes at what I did read.

tagged → #reblogs
beautifulcentury:

Muiderberg   strandje  1919 by janwillemsen on Flickr.

beautifulcentury:

Muiderberg strandje 1919 by janwillemsen on Flickr.

tagged → #reblogs

alyosius:

8/10.  Awwww yis.

Great Scott! You know your Fitz, old sport! Just don’t have too much bubbly celebrating his birthday today…

Okay, well, The Guardian, that was a little insensitive.  

10/10 and I even guessed on two of them!