moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Mary Pickford’s wedding dress at her wedding to Douglas Fairbanks in 1920
via

That’s not Mary Pickford and it is not her wedding gown.
This is her wedding gown:


Who is the mysterious woman in the first photo, I wonder? Thanks for clearing this up!

I sent out a tweet for help. Hopefully, we will know soon. :-)

Hooray! If anyone recognizes the woman in the first photo, let us know!

Several Twitter investigators have said Mary Miles Minter. I am now checking into MMM’s filmography to see if a a movie matches this still

If you find out that it is her please tell me. I’m not at home and can’t do a thorough google search. 

I am now leaning toward Claire Windsor. What do you think?


She does look really similar as does Corinne Griffith. I’m just going to leave the caption blank. 

moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Mary Pickford’s wedding dress at her wedding to Douglas Fairbanks in 1920

via

That’s not Mary Pickford and it is not her wedding gown.

This is her wedding gown:

Who is the mysterious woman in the first photo, I wonder? Thanks for clearing this up!

I sent out a tweet for help. Hopefully, we will know soon. :-)

Hooray! If anyone recognizes the woman in the first photo, let us know!

Several Twitter investigators have said Mary Miles Minter. I am now checking into MMM’s filmography to see if a a movie matches this still

If you find out that it is her please tell me. I’m not at home and can’t do a thorough google search. 

I am now leaning toward Claire Windsor. What do you think?

She does look really similar as does Corinne Griffith. I’m just going to leave the caption blank. 

tagged → #reblogs
kittyinva asked: I think the actress in the faux-Mary pic is Corinne Griffith, but am not certain. If you follow me, I happen to have a picture of her up today and there is a strong resemblance. Kathie

My husband and I compared the photo to Corinne Griffith, Mary Miles Minter, and Claire Windsor and we both are leaning towards Corrine Griffith. But I’m not sure if we will ever know for sure.

tagged → #asks #kittyinva
thehystericalsociety:

Cooling down - Druid Hill Park, Baltimore - c. 1930 - (Via)

thehystericalsociety:

Cooling down - Druid Hill Park, Baltimore - c. 1930 - (Via)

tagged → #reblogs
Mistakes happen, and you’re human. Great blog, btw.

Thank you. I feel a little bit of a hypocrite since I am so vigilant at pointing out wrongly captioned photos in the Zelda Fitzgerald tag. And I try to make this blog as accurate as possible.

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Mary Pickford’s wedding dress at her wedding to Douglas Fairbanks in 1920
via

That’s not Mary Pickford and it is not her wedding gown.
This is her wedding gown:


Who is the mysterious woman in the first photo, I wonder? Thanks for clearing this up!

I sent out a tweet for help. Hopefully, we will know soon. :-)

Hooray! If anyone recognizes the woman in the first photo, let us know!

Several Twitter investigators have said Mary Miles Minter. I am now checking into MMM’s filmography to see if a a movie matches this still

If you find out that it is her please tell me. I’m not at home and can’t do a thorough google search. 

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

1863-project:

moviessilently:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

Mary Pickford’s wedding dress at her wedding to Douglas Fairbanks in 1920

via

That’s not Mary Pickford and it is not her wedding gown.

This is her wedding gown:

Who is the mysterious woman in the first photo, I wonder? Thanks for clearing this up!

I sent out a tweet for help. Hopefully, we will know soon. :-)

Hooray! If anyone recognizes the woman in the first photo, let us know!

Several Twitter investigators have said Mary Miles Minter. I am now checking into MMM’s filmography to see if a a movie matches this still

If you find out that it is her please tell me. I’m not at home and can’t do a thorough google search. 

I feel really embarrassed. That picture that posted this morning was not Mary Pickford, that’s what I get for not double checking that it was her. I’ve seen people say it was Mary Miles Minter. I’ve taken the caption off until I can verify that it was Mary Miles Minter (or another actress).

I am so sorry that I captioned it wrong. I’ll try to do better next time.

theredshoes:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

theredshoes:

What I’m reading. Sadly, like everything else I have ever read by Marion Meade, it is terribly written. What’s really infuriating about it is how often she mocks the women she’s supposedly celebrating. Or at least describing. It’s a great idea — Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St Vincent Millay, Edna Ferber and Dorothy Parker were all more than tangentially connected, and inhabited very different literary worlds (what connected them all was popularity) — but just so poorly executed.
 (Altho if you’re going for “running wild,” Tallulah Bankhead would have been a better choice than Ferber — and if someone more literary instead, Ruth Hale or even Jane Grant would have also been better than Ferber. Sorry, Edna. — And what about Mercedes de Acosta? Isadora Duncan? Alla Nazimova? Eva la Gallienne? …..anyway.) (But really, is there anyone who’s read So Big? — besides unabridgedchick probably. I haven’t read So Big, and I love that period. Hell, I don’t think I even knew Show Boat was based on her book until now, and I know my parents forced me to watch that as a kid. I did know she wrote Giant. I think.)

Aww man I really wanted to read that book. If you don’t mind answering in how did she mock them? Just curiosities sake.

It’s just the way she keeps constantly taking digs at them. I’m just reading this now about Millay:
That a middle-aged balding man she had not seen since 1913 would suddenly want to marry her was so lacking in credibility that the half-baked idea almost sounded believable. With each passing day she became more enthusiastic. The plain fact was both of her sisters were married….and she remained an old maid….He was hugely rich, manly enough in appearance, and in a way she did love him.
And that’s just….wrong. It’s SO wrong. This was part of a complicated triangle between her, Witter Bynner and Fiske, and she set those triangles up all her life — the most famous was probably her and John Peale Bishop and Bunny Wilson — and yeah, his wealth was a big part of Bynner’s appeal, but she and he and Fiske had all been corresponding for years. Their dynamic was complex and enmeshed and triangulated, and Meade just treats it as a joke.
And that’s one paragraph. If you read her biography of Dorothy Parker it’s the same kind of thing — very belittling, shallow, sometimes in places almost mean (more on Millay: “Lo and behold, some cunning little girl had figured out how to entrap him. For this Gladys person he was going to duck out on his marriage, something he had allowed Vincent to believe was impossible”). There’s no empathy or even just human understanding.
I also don’t believe at ANY point in her life Millay even possibly thought of herself as an “old maid” (an antique phrase Meade keeps repeating throughout the book, usually with regard to Edna Ferber).
(I’m reading it because someone gave it to me, and I did think Meade’s biography of Parker had some good research in it, and I just read Milford’s biography of Millay. I’m really interested in the period. But I just don’t know if I’m going to be able to finish it.)

Ugh that just sounds horrible. I’m definitely removing my list of books I want to read. 
I’ve seen that same sort of writing for Zelda Fitzgerald. And I can’t understand why someone would write a book about people they don’t like or don’t respect?

theredshoes:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

theredshoes:

What I’m reading. Sadly, like everything else I have ever read by Marion Meade, it is terribly written. What’s really infuriating about it is how often she mocks the women she’s supposedly celebrating. Or at least describing. It’s a great idea — Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St Vincent Millay, Edna Ferber and Dorothy Parker were all more than tangentially connected, and inhabited very different literary worlds (what connected them all was popularity) — but just so poorly executed.


(Altho if you’re going for “running wild,” Tallulah Bankhead would have been a better choice than Ferber — and if someone more literary instead, Ruth Hale or even Jane Grant would have also been better than Ferber. Sorry, Edna. — And what about Mercedes de Acosta? Isadora Duncan? Alla Nazimova? Eva la Gallienne? …..anyway.) (But really, is there anyone who’s read So Big? — besides unabridgedchick probably. I haven’t read So Big, and I love that period. Hell, I don’t think I even knew Show Boat was based on her book until now, and I know my parents forced me to watch that as a kid. I did know she wrote Giant. I think.)

Aww man I really wanted to read that book. If you don’t mind answering in how did she mock them? Just curiosities sake.

It’s just the way she keeps constantly taking digs at them. I’m just reading this now about Millay:

That a middle-aged balding man she had not seen since 1913 would suddenly want to marry her was so lacking in credibility that the half-baked idea almost sounded believable. With each passing day she became more enthusiastic. The plain fact was both of her sisters were married….and she remained an old maid….He was hugely rich, manly enough in appearance, and in a way she did love him.

And that’s just….wrong. It’s SO wrong. This was part of a complicated triangle between her, Witter Bynner and Fiske, and she set those triangles up all her life — the most famous was probably her and John Peale Bishop and Bunny Wilson — and yeah, his wealth was a big part of Bynner’s appeal, but she and he and Fiske had all been corresponding for years. Their dynamic was complex and enmeshed and triangulated, and Meade just treats it as a joke.

And that’s one paragraph. If you read her biography of Dorothy Parker it’s the same kind of thing — very belittling, shallow, sometimes in places almost mean (more on Millay: “Lo and behold, some cunning little girl had figured out how to entrap him. For this Gladys person he was going to duck out on his marriage, something he had allowed Vincent to believe was impossible”). There’s no empathy or even just human understanding.

I also don’t believe at ANY point in her life Millay even possibly thought of herself as an “old maid” (an antique phrase Meade keeps repeating throughout the book, usually with regard to Edna Ferber).

(I’m reading it because someone gave it to me, and I did think Meade’s biography of Parker had some good research in it, and I just read Milford’s biography of Millay. I’m really interested in the period. But I just don’t know if I’m going to be able to finish it.)

Ugh that just sounds horrible. I’m definitely removing my list of books I want to read. 

I’ve seen that same sort of writing for Zelda Fitzgerald. And I can’t understand why someone would write a book about people they don’t like or don’t respect?

theredshoes:

What I’m reading. Sadly, like everything else I have ever read by Marion Meade, it is terribly written. What’s really infuriating about it is how often she mocks the women she’s supposedly celebrating. Or at least describing. It’s a great idea — Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St Vincent Millay, Edna Ferber and Dorothy Parker were all more than tangentially connected, and inhabited very different literary worlds (what connected them all was popularity) — but just so poorly executed.
 (Altho if you’re going for “running wild,” Tallulah Bankhead would have been a better choice than Ferber — and if someone more literary instead, Ruth Hale or even Jane Grant would have also been better than Ferber. Sorry, Edna. — And what about Mercedes de Acosta? Isadora Duncan? Alla Nazimova? Eva la Gallienne? …..anyway.) (But really, is there anyone who’s read So Big? — besides unabridgedchick probably. I haven’t read So Big, and I love that period. Hell, I don’t think I even knew Show Boat was based on her book until now, and I know my parents forced me to watch that as a kid. I did know she wrote Giant. I think.)

Aww man I really wanted to read that book. If you don’t mind answering in how did she mock them? Just for curiosities sake.

theredshoes:

What I’m reading. Sadly, like everything else I have ever read by Marion Meade, it is terribly written. What’s really infuriating about it is how often she mocks the women she’s supposedly celebrating. Or at least describing. It’s a great idea — Zelda Fitzgerald, Edna St Vincent Millay, Edna Ferber and Dorothy Parker were all more than tangentially connected, and inhabited very different literary worlds (what connected them all was popularity) — but just so poorly executed.


(Altho if you’re going for “running wild,” Tallulah Bankhead would have been a better choice than Ferber — and if someone more literary instead, Ruth Hale or even Jane Grant would have also been better than Ferber. Sorry, Edna. — And what about Mercedes de Acosta? Isadora Duncan? Alla Nazimova? Eva la Gallienne? …..anyway.) (But really, is there anyone who’s read So Big? — besides unabridgedchick probably. I haven’t read So Big, and I love that period. Hell, I don’t think I even knew Show Boat was based on her book until now, and I know my parents forced me to watch that as a kid. I did know she wrote Giant. I think.)

Aww man I really wanted to read that book. If you don’t mind answering in how did she mock them? Just for curiosities sake.

tagged → #reblogs
womenwhoride:

Here, in 1912, group photo falling on the Chicago Motorcycle Club Picnic, the first gatherings of fans of Harley-Davidson.

womenwhoride:

Here, in 1912, group photo falling on the Chicago Motorcycle Club Picnic, the first gatherings of fans of Harley-Davidson.

tagged → #reblogs