tmaction:

The Crack-UpAn essay in three parts by F. Scott Fitzgerald
My favourite passage from part two, Pasting It Together

Now the standard cure for one who is sunk is to consider those in actual destitution or physical suffering — this is an all-weather beatitude for gloom in general and fairly salutary daytime advice for everyone. But at three o’clock in the morning, a forgotten package has the same tragic importance as a death sentence, and the cure doesn’t work — and in a real dark night of the soul it is always three o’clock in the morning, day after day. At that hour the tendency is to refuse to face things as long as possible by retiring into an infantile dream — but one is continually startled out of this by various contacts with the world. One meets these occasions as quickly and carelessly as possible and retires once more back into the dream, hoping that things will adjust themselves by some great material or spiritual bonanza. But as the withdrawal persists there is less and less chance of the bonanza — one is not waiting for the fade-out of a single sorrow, but rather being an unwilling witness of an execution, the disintegration of one’s own personality…

Originally published in Esquire in 1936Read it onlineOr buy a first edition of right here, going cheap

tmaction:

The Crack-Up
An essay in three parts by F. Scott Fitzgerald

My favourite passage from part two, Pasting It Together

Now the standard cure for one who is sunk is to consider those in actual destitution or physical suffering — this is an all-weather beatitude for gloom in general and fairly salutary daytime advice for everyone. But at three o’clock in the morning, a forgotten package has the same tragic importance as a death sentence, and the cure doesn’t work — and in a real dark night of the soul it is always three o’clock in the morning, day after day. At that hour the tendency is to refuse to face things as long as possible by retiring into an infantile dream — but one is continually startled out of this by various contacts with the world. One meets these occasions as quickly and carelessly as possible and retires once more back into the dream, hoping that things will adjust themselves by some great material or spiritual bonanza. But as the withdrawal persists there is less and less chance of the bonanza — one is not waiting for the fade-out of a single sorrow, but rather being an unwilling witness of an execution, the disintegration of one’s own personality…

Originally published in Esquire in 1936
Read it online
Or buy a first edition of right here, going cheap

23silence:

Annie French (1872-1965) - The Briar Maiden

23silence:

Annie French (1872-1965) - The Briar Maiden

tagged → #reblogs

zeldaslayer:

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

So I seriously hated this article. It started out saying how he wrote the article not because it was an anniversary but because he just liked writing about Scott (it came off very pretentious to me). Then came this doozy

Only a few days after the publication of the novel did he have enough money to propose once again to the gorgeous, rich, and tormented Zelda, who had constantly rejected and mocked him for the last two years, because he was not wealthy enough to grant her the lifestyle she demanded.

Like it is so horrible that a woman in the 1920s would want financial security since married women couldn’t hold a job basically. It’s so horrible that practicality would enter into a marriage. So many people write about women without taking into account historical context. 

According to the author Zelda was the cause of everything horrible in Scott’s life. I bet the author thinks that Scott making horrible grades at Princeton was Zelda’s fault too.

Some more quotes

Zelda’s craving for magnificence and Scott’s sudden prosperity transformed him into the same character whom he caustically despised in his novels

[…] 

She underwent her first nervous breakdown in 1930 and blamed her husband for her condition in a furious autobiographic novel, entitled Save Me the Waltz. Her husband, deeply in love, answered her cry by using the same method and publishing, what became, one of the most successful books of his entire literary production,Tender is the Night (1934). 

The entire article was about how Scott was the most awesomest writer to ever have existed and Zelda was the cause of every single bad thing that happened in the history of the world. 

This author has a fundamentally flawed view of Scott. Scott didn’t really hate rich people, he was jealous of them and he so wanted to be one of them. But he always felt separate because he grew up kind of poor (and had money struggles all his life). Scott would have cut off his right arm to be one of the elite and this was when he was a kid before he even met Zelda.

How can you write about Scott and get such a large part of his personality wrong? Zelda didn’t make him drink and spend all his money he was already well on his way to doing that before he met her. And it is just gross how the author of this piece describes both Save Me the Waltz and Tender is the Night. I hope to god this is really bad satire that I didn’t get.

kittyinva replied to your link “The sculptor of Word and singer of the Roaring Twenties Jazz: the great Fitzgerald – his life, his works”

This person knows much less than he thinks he does. Pretentious prat! Kathie

He really does! The sad thing is that the Fitzgerald Museum shared the article on facebook which means they endorse this type of hatred towards Zelda. 

Edit: Or maybe not endorse but they allow it would be a better way of putting it.

So I seriously hated this article. It started out saying how he wrote the article not because it was an anniversary but because he just liked writing about Scott (it came off very pretentious to me). Then came this doozy

Only a few days after the publication of the novel did he have enough money to propose once again to the gorgeous, rich, and tormented Zelda, who had constantly rejected and mocked him for the last two years, because he was not wealthy enough to grant her the lifestyle she demanded.

Like it is so horrible that a woman in the 1920s would want financial security since married women couldn’t hold a job basically. It’s so horrible that practicality would enter into a marriage. So many people write about women without taking into account historical context. 

According to the author Zelda was the cause of everything horrible in Scott’s life. I bet the author thinks that Scott making horrible grades at Princeton was Zelda’s fault too.

Some more quotes

Zelda’s craving for magnificence and Scott’s sudden prosperity transformed him into the same character whom he caustically despised in his novels

[…] 

She underwent her first nervous breakdown in 1930 and blamed her husband for her condition in a furious autobiographic novel, entitled Save Me the Waltz. Her husband, deeply in love, answered her cry by using the same method and publishing, what became, one of the most successful books of his entire literary production,Tender is the Night (1934). 

The entire article was about how Scott was the most awesomest writer to ever have existed and Zelda was the cause of every single bad thing that happened in the history of the world. 

Anonymous asked: what kind of job do you have? :) your blog is great

I don’t actually have one (besides working on this blog and doing some cross stitch that I’m going to try and sell on etsy) because of some personal issues.

Thank you! I really enjoy doing this blog.

tagged → #asks #Anonymous
historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

tagged → #reblogs
Anonymous asked: Moment of silence for all those beautiful, talented, unique women whose only legacy is that they constantly get mistaken for Zelda Fitzgerald.

And a moment of silence for those people who think that any black and white or sepia picture is of Zelda Fitzgerald.

tagged → #asks #Anonymous